Category Archives: History

The history of the Bradford District

Updated Bradford Council logo, 2017

Updating the Bradford Council logo

You might have noticed over the past few weeks that we have updated our Council logo. The logo we are now using is based on our civic crest, originally granted in 1976. The crest reflects the wonderful history of our city and the towns which make up our district. The motto on the crest is ‘Progress, Industry, Humanity’, which still chimes well with our priorities today.

Bradford Council civic crest
The Bradford Council civic crest reflects the history of the city and the entire district

As well as the crest, we are using an updated colour scheme, with shades of green, blue, burnt orange and sand that all feature in the crest.

We have also designed a new simpler version of the crest, with fewer colours and less detail. We will use this in places where it is not possible to reproduce all the details on the full crest, or where the crest will be displayed very small. For example, we are using the simpler version as the icon used to identify Bradford Council on this blog.

Bradford Council simplified logo
The simplified logo will be used where it is not possible to recreate the detail of the full logo

The main Bradford Council website has been updated with the crest and new colour scheme. Some other online systems have also been changed. But some online systems will take longer as our web team will be working with various third parties to get our logo and colours updated. All in all, our web team has identified 120 online systems that need updating.

We are not replacing our logo everywhere at once, so you will still see the old blue and orange logo in some places for a while yet. But as we replace or refresh Council property and materials across the district we will now be using the civic crest.

Old Bradford Council logo
The old blue and orange logo will now be phased out

Even while we used the blue and orange logo, the civic crest never dropped out of use, and was still shown in certain places. Using only the crest in future will give us a more consistent image and will better reflect the whole of the district and our rich history.

History and symbolism of the civic crest

The civic crest is based on our coat of arms, which was granted in 1976, but has origins as far back as 1847 and the original ‘Bradford shield’.

The crest features a shield supported by a stag and an angora goat, with a boar’s head at the top. The shield includes two bugle horns, a fleece, a fountain and eleven Yorkshire roses. Three more Yorkshire roses are set on each of the collars worn by the stag and the angora goat.

The various elements of the civic crest have links with different parts of the district and their own heritage. Continue reading Updating the Bradford Council logo

Remembering the Holocaust

Victims and survivors were remembered at a special ceremony in Bradford’s City Hall on 27 January, 2017.

Guest blogger, Nigel Grizzard, Researcher, and Bradford Jewish Historian writes about how his family and community continue to be affected by the Holocaust.

It is 72 years since the liberation of the Auschwitz Death Camp on January 27th, 1945 by the Allied Forces and it is right that we remember those horrendous events of the Nazi era from 1933-1945.

The theme for this year is ‘How can life go on?’ proposed by the Holocaust Survivor and profound thinker the late Elie Wiesel, after the Holocaust and I want to tell you my thoughts.

The further away we get from the Holocaust, I as a Jew, wonder whether we are getting closer to it, more and more information comes out the Holocaust, and the past which has been closed off now becomes more open as documents are found and research has been done.

I was born in 1952. The generation of Jews after the Holocaust and I had a comfortable childhood in London, but as I’ve grown older I’ve had the chance to research and it has left a profound effect on me. In 1976 I moved North to work for Bradford Council.
My family who bear the name Grizzard came to London in the 1840s and 1850s from Amsterdam in Holland. On my father’s side we were British Jews of Dutch ancestry – but from many years ago. Continue reading Remembering the Holocaust

Events remembering the Battle of the Somme

A number of events are planned in the Bradford District during the summer of 2016 to mark the centenary of the Battle of the Somme. The battle was fought between 1 July and 18 November 1916.

At 7.30am on 1 July 1916, 2,000 young men from Bradford left their trenches and by the end of the first hour of the battle 1,770 of them had either been killed or injured.

On this page you will find information about some of the events that are happening this summer as well as links to further local resources about the Battle of the Somme and the First World War.

1 July: Bradford Pals commemoration

At 11am on 1 July, the Lord Mayor will lead a commemoration event at the Bradford Pals’ Memorial in the Memorial Garden behind the Bradford Cenotaph. This annual event remembers the sacrifices made by the Bradford Pals during the First World War.

22 June to 30 September: Garden within a Garden

Acclaimed Pakistani artist Imran Qureshi has painted two public artworks in Bradford inspired by the history of the million-strong British Indian army that fought in the First World War. You can see two different paintings for this Garden Within a Garden project in the temporary gardens of City Park and the Mughal Gardens outside Cartwright Hall.

2 July onwards: Somme 100 – Keighley’s Stories exhibition

An exhibition of Keighley’s stories will open at Keighley Local Studies Library on Saturday, 2 July and will run throughout the summer. The opening event on 2 July will include a talk by Andy Wade and a screening of the film The Battle of the Somme. Join the Facebook event for the day.

2 to 15 July: Exhibition at Shipley Library

More than 350 men from the Shipley area were killed, missing or wounded in the Battle of the Somme. These men will be remembered in an exhibition called Shipley and District Remembers the Battle of The Somme. The exhibition is at Shipley Library from 2 to 15 July.

The research for this exhibition was collated by Shipley in WW1 who will be available between 10am and 2pm in the library on Saturday, 2 July to share information about people who served. Join the Facebook event. Continue reading Events remembering the Battle of the Somme

Why we renamed a building after Bradfordian Sir Henry Mitchell

You may have noticed that one of our buildings is now called Sir Henry Mitchell House – and you may be forgiven for wondering why.

The former Mercury House in Manchester Road, which now bears Sir Henry’s moniker, is the new home of Bradford Council’s children’s services.

Previously our children’s services were dispersed around the district in separate offices. We decided to bring them all together at 4 Manchester Road, as part of our drive to save money by selling off under-used offices around the district.

But back to Sir Henry Mitchell. What’s his connection with Bradford? Well, born in Esholt, Sir Henry lived from 1824 to 1898 and was a Bradford mill owner and philanthropist, though not quite on the same scale as Sir Titus Salt who built an entire village.

Sir Henry Mitchell

Sir Henry founded Bradford Technical School, now part of Bradford College. He was rewarded by becoming Mayor of Bradford in 1874 and the first Honorary Freeman of the City of Bradford (a ceremonial honour with mediaeval origins which brings no special privileges these days, but is a mark of a city’s gratitude for exceptional services).

Read more about Sir Henry Mitchell on Wikipedia.

Later this year the former Central Library building is to be named Margaret McMillan Tower. That’s after Margaret McMillan who lived from 1860 to 1931 and campaigned for universal suffrage and reforms to improve the health of young children. We’ll write more about Margaret McMillan when that building opens.

Henry Mitchell picture credit:
Henry Mitchell Vanity Fair 5 July 1890 by Leslie Ward – Published in Vanity Fair, 5 July 1890.  Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Last chance for a Sneaky Peek inside City Hall

The Sneaky Peek tours in Bradford’s City Hall, which have been taking place throughout August, have proved so popular that we’ve put on an extra tour.

Over 1,000 people have already toured Bradford’s magnificent 19th century Grade 1 listed building.

To let even more people take a look inside City Hall, organisers have added an extended four-hour opening on Saturday, 13 September. Volunteers will help at the event from 12 noon to 4pm.

And you still have chance to come on one of the remaining weekday tours on Wednesday 10th September (2pm to 4pm) or Thursday 11th September (10am to 12 noon).

Pop in, pick up a route map and start your tour. On the way you will see special displays put together by museums staff to bring to life landmarks in Bradford’s textile and engineering heritage.

Help raise money for Bradford Pals memorial

Queuing to sign up for Bradford PalsWe are working with the Telegraph & Argus newspaper to raise funds for a memorial to the Bradford Pals and other troops from the city who fought and died in the Battle of the Somme almost one hundred years ago.

As the Bradford district marks the 100th anniversary of the start of World War One, we are asking residents to donate to the Honour the Pals appeal.

It is hoped this memorial will be unveiled in France on the centenary of the beginning of the Battle of the Somme on 1 July 2016 as a lasting reminder of the sacrifice made by these World War One heroes.

Having a memorial in France is important not least for educating visitors, including school children, about the immense sacrifice made by the city’s young men on the battlefields of World War One.

How you can donate

If you wish to make a contribution to the appeal, you can donate online.  If you would rather donate by cheque, please make the cheque payable to Honour the Pals Appeal.  Send your cheque, with your name, address and contact details to:

Honour the Pals Appeal
Telegraph & Argus
Hall Ings
Bradford
BD1 1JR

Alternatively, hand your cheque in at the Telegraph & Argus office, City Hall, in Bradford or Keighley Town Hall.

The Bradford Council website has more information about the Honour the Bradford Pals appeal.

The photos we have used here are courtesy of Bradford Museums & Galleries.